Bookshelf

After the Prophet

by Lesley Hazleton

The Sunni-Shia split, and it’s impact on the Middle East 1400 years later, intrigues me and the author did a fantastic job of delivering the facts without cultural or mythological bias. Lesley gives fair voice to both Sunnis and Shias throughout the book.

Born A Crime

by Trevor Noah

I will never listen to an audio book as good as this one again! Such an honest, detailed and vivid journey through growing up mixed-race in apartheid South Africa (yis!) blended with Trevor’s comical genius that comes so naturally to him. The last chapter, a truly emotional tribute to his superhero mum, reduced me to […]

Work Rules!

by Laszlo Bock

I read this as a follow-up to ‘How Google Works’. It’s very well articulated and shows an entirely new dimension to Human Resources. I really came to appreciate the effort Google put in to hiring and their people – and being a techy, I really appreciated the analytical approach to common HR problems.

How Google Works

by Eric Schmidt & Jonathan Rosenberg

I loved this book! It completely changed my outlook on management and has inspired me to become a leader. True management is so much more than just assigning work and approving holidays. I now agree with the authors that the most important thing a manager does, is hire.

The New Silk Roads

by Peter Frankopan

I thoroughly enjoyed this book because a lot of the content covered was current and relatable. Unfortunately the author focuses a bit too much on Trump for my liking, but eventually swings full attention to the elephant in the room: China.

The Silk Roads

by Peter Frankopan

This was a very long audio book to listen to. But, it gives a very detailed and compelling insight to the global empires since 300BC – all back with historical accounts. However, it left me with the impression that the Silk Roads are not as ‘ancient’ as I originally thought.